Building

Building a web app with functional programming

Summary

  1. Building a web app with functional programming series :bookmark:
  2. Definition of production ready :bookmark:
  3. Elm – part I :bookmark:
  4. Elm – part II :bookmark:
  5. Haskell – part I :bookmark:
  6. Haskell – part II :bookmark:
  7. Nixos :bookmark:

This is the last article of this series and will focus on my experience with NixOS.
In a nutshell, NixOS is a operating system based on Linux that provides a declarative package and configuration management.

Please note this article was written upon my experience that started months ago. I know there have been great improvements since and people are making NixOS better everyday. So this post may not be relevant anymore in a near future.

Let me begin by writing why I chose NixOS. When I started PatchGirl, I originally thought I would have my hands full with learning Elm and improving my Haskell knowledge. I hence went with a more traditional Docker approach.
My concern at

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Software Security: Building Security In.

Software Security series
Buy the box set now!

Software Security series
The Software Security series

“When it comes to software security, the devil is in the details. This book tackles the details.”

—Bruce Schneier
CTO and founder, Counterpane
Author of Beyond Fear and Secrets and Lies

Software Security: Building Security In
Buy the book!

Beginning where the best-selling book Building Secure Software left off, Software Security teaches you how to put software security into practice. The software security best practices, or touchpoints, described in this book have their basis in good software engineering and involve explicitly pondering security throughout the software development lifecycle. This means knowing and understanding common risks (including implementation bugs and architectural flaws), designing for security, and subjecting all software artifacts to thorough, objective risk analyses and testing.

Software Security is about putting the touchpoints to work for you. Because you can apply these touchpoints to the kinds of software artifacts you already produce as you develop software,

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Architectural Programming | WBDG – Whole Building Design Guide

Introduction

Architectural programming began when architecture began. Structures have always been based on programs: decisions were made, something was designed, built and occupied. In a way, archaeologists excavate buildings to try to determine their programs.

Today, we define architectural programming as the research and decision-making process that identifies the scope of work to be designed. Synonyms include “facility programming,” “functional and operational requirements,” and “scoping.” In the early 1960s, William Peña, John Focke, and Bill Caudill of Caudill, Rowlett, and Scott (CRS) developed a process for organizing programming efforts. Their work was documented in Problem Seeking, the text that guided many architects and clients who sought to identify the scope of a design problem prior to beginning the design, which is intended to solve the problem.

In the 1980s and 1990s, some architectural schools began to drop architectural programming from their curricula. The emphasis of the Post-Modern and Deconstruction

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10 Tips for Building a Successful Software Business


5 min read

Opinions expressed by Entrepreneur contributors are their own.


As more and more businesses warm up to cloud-based services, the software-as-a-service industry continues to grow fast. The Gartner CRM Guide, published in March predicts, for example, that by 2015, for the first time, more than 50 percent of customer-relationship management deployments will be deployed as SaaS, and that by 2025 that number will surpass 80 percent.

As Mark Andreessen would say, “software as a service is eating up the world.”

Related: Considering ‘SaaS’? What You Need to Know

Consider these 10 tips to create a successful business in this expanding industry:

1. Follow KISS (keep it simple, stupid)

SaaS products are often self served, and as such need to be self explanatory, simple, clean and highly intuitive. Sales and marketing collateral need to highlight value, return on investment and use flows, not features and technology.

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